EOLPodcast, Spirituality, Tragedy

Ep. 168 How to Find Compassion in Times of Suffering

 

PodcastCompassion

 

 

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Photo credit: @NBCLA

Today I’ll share some thoughts on recent tragedies that have occurred near me this week, the meaning of compassion, and why at times we humans are not able to feel compassion for others when they suffer. Then I’ll share the words that have guided me to experience deeper compassion for many years. Download a copy of the Lovingkindness Blessing below:

Lovingkindness Blessing

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

DDCteachTune in to a series of brief webinars by 5 new teachers of death and dying classes. They share excerpts from their courses that we hope will inspire you to want to teach your own community class based on your knowledge, experience and passion for end-of-life issues. Click here to watch the webinars.

Teach about Death and #ChangetheWorld!

To further your own end-of-life education check out the Integrative Thanatology Certificate Program at the Open Center’s Art of Dying Institute at this link: https://www.opencenter.org/art-of-dying-intergrative-thanatology

FEATURE PRESENTATION:

In this episode I discuss:

  • Why we sometimes react negatively toward others who are suffering rather than with compassion
  • The meaning of the word compassion (“to suffer with”)
  • Why the ego rejects and judges the suffering of others
  • Why we must grow spiritually before we can experience genuine compassion for others
  • The lotus blossom as a symbol of compassion and spiritual growth
  • How the 5 verses of the Lovingkindness Blessing signify the necessary steps toward sharing genuine compassion during times of suffering:
    • May I be at peace
    • May my heart remain open
    • May I realize the beauty of my own true nature
    • May I be healed
    • May I be a source of healing for this world

You can help support this podcast and the EOLU Interview Series in 3 ways (THANK YOU in advance!):

  1. Tell other people about it who might enjoy this content
  2. Leave a review on iTunes
  3. Make a small donation ($1 per month) on my page at Patreon.com/eolu

Until next week …

Face Your Fear          BE Ready         Love Your Life

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End of Life, EOLPodcast

Ep. 167 Music Thanatology and Integrative Thanatology Training with Catharine DeLong

PodcastDelong

 

 

CatharineDeLongIn this episode I have a conversation with Catharine DeLong about her work as a music thanatologist. We also discuss the Integrative Thanatology Certificate Program being offered by the Art of Dying Institute of the New York Open Center. If you are interested in the training which begins on January 4, 2019, register before Dec. 1st to get the discounted early-bird rate.

Learn more and sign up here:

https://www.opencenter.org/art-of-dying-intergrative-thanatology

ANNOUNCEMENT:

Patreonbecome2xTHANK YOU to my latest supporter on Patreon.com/eolu: Licha Kelley-King! I appreciate all of you who have been making monthly donations to keep this show on the air. If you want to join the team and receive special bonuses click here to learn more: Patreon.com/eolu.

FEATURE PRESENTATION:

Today Catharine DeLong joins me to talk about her field of Music Thanatology and the Integrative Thanatology Certificate Program. We discuss:

  • What is “music thanatology”
  • The benefits of music thanatology for dying patients and their loved ones
  • How to use music in end-of-life situations when a music thanatologist is not available
  • The structure of the Integrative Thanatology Certificate Program offered by the Art of Dying Institute at the New York Open Center
  • Who the certificate program is for
  • Faculty members who will be teaching in 2019
  • How to register and get the “early-bird” rate for the program

Click here to learn more about the Certificate Program.

Tune in every Monday for a new episode of this podcast. If you enjoy this content please share it with others who might be interested and consider leaving a review on iTunes.

Until next time …

Face Your Fear          BE Ready           Love Your Life

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EOLPodcast, Grief Travel, Tragedy

Ep. 166 Grief Travel: Lessons from Spain

PodcastSpainpic

 

 

IMG_6174In this episode I’m back from my travels in Spain and share some stories from my trip. When I travel I focus on learning how other cultures have experienced loss and grief throughout history in order to form a deeper connection with all people everywhere. Grief is the great connector of humankind as a universal experience.

(Photo: Tomb of Christopher Columbus in the Cathedral of Sevilla. For more photos go to my Instagram page.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

bartonwebinarThere will be a webinar with Jane Barton on developing resilience in later life titled “Bridge Time: Dealing with the Consequences of Change” on Tuesday October 30th.

Sign up here to listen live or get the replay after the broadcast.

 

Patreonbecome2xThis podcast is supported through generous donations on my page at Patreon.com/eolu. This week I’m sending a HUGE THANK YOU to the following new patrons: Tawnya Musser, Julie, Rowena Wallen, Issac Seigel, and Alicia Coleman. If you’d like to join the team and contribute to this work you can learn more and sign up at Patreon.com/eolu.

FEATURE PRESENTATION:

Here are some highlights of my travels in Spain:

  • In Madrid I learned about the terrorist attacks on commuter trains coming into Atocha Station that took place on 3/11/2004, which reminded me of 9/11 in the U.S. I understood the grief, panic and horror that struck all of Spain that day as they experienced the overwhelming shock of such an attack on their own soil.guernica
  • I saw Picasso’s painting “Guernica” at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid and learned about the tragic bombing of the Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War in 1937. The painting is massive and very moving to behold in real life as it portrays the anguish of that awful day.
  • Through travels in Toledo and the region of Andalusia I learned about the convivencia, a period of relative tolerance between Muslims, Jews and Christians who lived as neighbors during the 700-year Muslim rule. They shared literature, poetry, architecture, design, agricultural and irrigation methods, and advances in science, astrology and medicine during the Dark Ages when the rest of Europe was in a time of regression. fullsizeoutput_1966
  • I visited La Mezquita in Cordoba, once the largest mosque in the world in the middle of which a huge cathedral was built after Catholics reclaimed the city from Muslim rule. The mosque is extraordinarily beautiful inside and much of the architecture was preserved and incorporated into the cathedral. The red and white arches of the mosque can be seen in the header of this post.IMG_4437
  • In Granada we visited the Alhambra, a gorgeous palace and walled city from the Nasrid dynasty that was surrendered to the Catholic monarchs of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella, in 1492 to finally end all Muslim rule in the country. The beauty of the palace has been preserved as an example of Moorish architecture that is also seen in many Jewish and Christian buildings from that time.IMG_4164
  • Finally we saw many monuments to Christopher Columbus throughout Spain and were there to witness the celebration of Columbus Day on October 12th, which is now being called Indigenous People’s Day in many places here in the U.S. It was fascinating to view Columbus’ exploration through the eyes of the “colonizing country” and compare it to the experience of the “colonized” in this country. Columbus died in poverty and disgrace after never finding the passage to India he was seeking, not knowing the legacy he was leaving behind (which is now tarnished from our perspective in the U.S.)

In conclusion, travel is a fascinating way to connect with people of different culture, ethnicity, race,  and religion and  has the power to bring us back to a place of convivencia, where we can live together in tolerance, even though we have different views. We share our humanity, our mortality and our grief as one people living on one planet.

Remember there will be a new episode every Monday! If you enjoy this content please share it with others and consider leaving a review on iTunes.

Until next time …

Face Your Fear            BE Ready            Love Your Life

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End of Life, EOLPodcast

Ep. 165 Part 4: The Palliative Care Team Chaplain with Stephanie Ryu

PodcastPallRyu

 

 

ProvidenceRyuITIn Part 4 of our series on palliative care I share an interview with Stephanie Ryu a palliative care chaplain. She’ll discuss her role providing spiritual support to patients with advanced illness. 

Learn more about palliative care here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

madrid-2713916_640My awesome Spain trip is at an end as this episode airs and I’ll be making my way back to Colorado! You can check out all of my pictures on Instagram at kwyattmd!

Tune in next week to hear my stories from Spain!

FEATURE PRESENTATION:

In this presentation Stephanie Ryu will discuss her role as a chaplain on the palliative care team.

You will learn:

  • How the work of a palliative care chaplain differs from other chaplaincy work
  • The role of spiritual care in the whole-person approach to illness and healing
  • The importance of spirituality at the end of life
  • How chaplains assist patients of all religions and those who follow no religion

Stephanie Ryu is a graduate of St. Xavier University and Fuller Theological Seminary. She completed CPE Residency at Providence St. Joseph – Burbank in 2012-13 along with a 6-month fellowship in hospice and palliative care. She now serves as a Palliative Care Chaplain for Providence Health and Services.

Tune in next week for a brand new episode!! If you like this content consider leaving a review on iTunes.

Until next time …

Face Your Fear         BE Ready         Love Your Life

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End of Life, EOLPodcast

Ep. 164 Part 3: The Palliative Care Team Social Worker with Andrea Strouth MSW

PodcastPallStrouth

 

 

ProvidenceStrouthIn Part 3 of our series on palliative care I share an interview with Andrea Strouth MSW a social worker on the palliative care team. She’ll talk about her role on the team to help us understand why social workers play an important part in the care of patients with advanced illness.

Learn more about palliative care here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

sagrada-familia-392009_640At the time of this broadcast I’m still enjoying my Spain trip – probably eating some tapas in Barcelona! I’ll be returning home in a few weeks but meanwhile check out my photos on Instagram at kwyattmd!

 

 

FEATURE PRESENTATION:

In this presentation Andrea Strouth LCSW, MSW will discuss the role of the social worker on the palliative care team.

You will learn:

  • The duties of the palliative care team social worker
  • Why palliative patients might need social work services
  • How the multidisciplinary palliative care team functions as a unit
  • The rewards of working on a palliative care team

Andrea Strouth received her MSW from the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently working at Providence Health & Services-Southern California to help develop their outpatient palliative care program. Previously, Andrea worked at the Abramson Cancer Center at Penn Medicine and in the Medical and Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Units at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her passion lies in advanced care planning and education surrounding end-of-life issues to ensure patients feel empowered in every aspect of their care.

Tune in next Monday for Part 4 of this series. If you find this content helpful please share it with other and consider leaving a review on iTunes! Also your contributions to my page at Patreon.com/eolu are always appreciated!

Until next time …

Face Your Fear         BE Ready           Love Your Life

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